Cold Sore Treatment

Get assessed by your pharmacist for a prescription to treat cold sores.

$39 Per Consultation

Review your symptoms and health history with a pharmacist to receive a prescription and medication to treat cold sores all in one visit.

How a Scripted Visit Works

Requesting a Scripted consultation is easy, your pharmacist is there to help.

Select a treatment and complete a digital self-assessment including medical history, symptoms, medications.

A pharmacist will have an in person consultation with you in the pharmacy.

If appropriate, the pharmacist will issue you a new prescription and fill or administer treatment in the same visit.

What are Cold Sores?

Cold sores are small, fluid-filled lesions that form around the mouth or on the lips. The medical name for oral cold sores is ‘herpes labialis’. Cold sores can affect both men and women of any age, but the initial presentation typically occurs during childhood.

What you should know

Our platform guides pharmacists to look at the answers you provide to our self-assessment questions to decide if you have cold sores that they can treat appropriately.

 

We use evidence based guidelines and protocols to ask you the right questions that will assess whether it’s safe for your pharmacist to prescribe or if you should be referred to a doctor, nurse, or specialist.

Cold Sore FAQ's

What causes cold sores?

Oral cold sores are most commonly caused by a virus called herpes simplex 1 (HSV1). Herpes simplex 2 (HSV2), commonly known for causing genital herpes, may also cause oral cold sores. A person may become infected with HSV1 or HSV2 through close contact with an infected individual, such as kissing. 

What are symptoms of cold sores?

Symptoms of cold sores may be more than just the cold sore lesion itself. Other symptoms include itching, burning, or pain around the mouth. Fever and chills may also be symptoms associated with cold sores; however, these are more commonly experienced with the first outbreak only.

How long does it take for cold sores to go away and will they come back?

Cold sores typically resolve in 2-5 days depending on the treatment used. Cold sores may take longer to go away on their own without treatment, typically 7-10 days. Cold sores have the potential of occuring again, as the HSV1/HSV2 infection itself is not curable. If your cold sores do not completely heal after treatment, let your doctor know. If you develop symptoms such as fever, swollen glands, difficulty swallowing, nausea, or vomiting, during a cold sore outbreak or treatment, seek medical care right away.

How can I prevent getting more cold sores?

Triggers for cold sore recurrence include bright light, stress, fatigue, and fever. Applying sunscreen before sun exposure may help prevent getting more cold sores. Limiting stress and getting enough sleep every night may also help reduce the chance of getting cold sores again.

How are cold sores treated?

Minor oral cold sores or a single oral cold sore may go away on their own or be treated with Abreva® cold sore cream, the only over-the-counter medication approved for shortening healing time and symptoms of cold sores. Multiple cold sores, large cold sores, and painful cold sores are best treated with prescription medications, the most common cold sore treatment method. Scripted is able to prescribe a variety of medications for most patients with oral cold sores.

Can I be seen through Scripted for my cold sores?

Males and females older than 6 years old, who present with classic cold sores around the mouth and have had cold sores in the past, may be treated through Scripted. We recommend you are seen by a doctor if any of the following apply to you:

Common Cold Sore Symptoms include:

  • Cold sore lesion
  • Itching around the mouth
  • Burning or pain around the mouth

References

References: 

  1. Cunningham A, Griffiths P, Leone P, Mindel A, Patel R, Stanberry L, Whitley R. Current management and recommendations for access to antiviral therapy of herpes labialis. J Clin Virol. 2012;53(1):6-11.
  2. Worrall G. Herpes labialis. BMJ Clin Evid. 2009;2009:1704.

Get Started with Scripted

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A text message will be sent to your phone to begin your Intake Form

Get Started with Scripted

Please complete the following fields

A text message will be sent to your phone to begin your Intake Form