Asthma Treatment

Get assessed by your pharmacist for a prescription to treat asthma.

$39 Per Consultation

Review your symptoms and health history with a pharmacist to receive a prescription to treat asthma all in one visit.

How a Scripted Visit Works

Requesting a Scripted consultation is easy, your pharmacist is there to help.

Select a treatment and complete a digital self-assessment including medical history, symptoms, medications.

A pharmacist will have an in person consultation with you in the pharmacy.

If appropriate, the pharmacist will issue you a new prescription and fill or administer treatment in the same visit.

What is Asthma?

Asthma is a chronic condition that causes inflammation of the airways. Asthma is typically diagnosed during childhood. Some children may outgrow their asthma, but many will have asthma that lasts through adulthood.

What you should know

Our platform guides pharmacists to look at the answers you provide to our self-assessment questions to decide if you have asthma that they can treat appropriately.

We use evidence based guidelines and protocols to ask you the right questions that will assess whether it’s safe for your pharmacist to prescribe or if you should be referred to a doctor, nurse, or specialist.

Asthma FAQ's

What causes asthma?

The exact cause of asthma is unknown. However, it is known that there are factors that may trigger asthma signs and symptoms. The most common asthma triggers are allergens, such as dust mites or pollen. Other common asthma triggers include tobacco smoke, respiratory infections, physical activity, cold air, emotional stress or excitement, or certain medications. Conditions that may worsen asthma include obesity, sleep apnea, depression, anxiety, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

What does asthma feel like?

Symptoms of asthma include wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, chest tightness, and possible increase in mucus production. Symptoms most commonly occur in presence of an asthma trigger but may occur without a trigger as well.

How is asthma treated?

Asthma is most commonly treated with inhaled medications. One type of inhaled medication called short-acting beta-agonists (SABAs) are used most commonly for asthma exacerbations, asthma caused by exercise, and for quick relief of asthma symptoms. These inhalers are commonly known as ‘rescue inhalers’ for asthma.

How long does it take for SABAs to work?

SABAs typically start working within 5-10 minutes. Depending on the severity of the asthma episode, multiple inhalations may be required and may be repeated. SABAs should quickly help open the airways, improving symptoms such as shortness of breath, wheezing, and chest tightness. If you are regularly using more than 6-8 inhalations per day of a SABA rescue inhaler or if you are using your SABA rescue inhaler more than twice per week for more than 4 weeks, let your doctor know. If your symptoms worsen or the SABA rescue inhaler does not quickly improve symptoms, call 911.

Are there any prevention methods?

There are no proven prevention methods to prevent asthma altogether. However, there are ways to prevent asthma exacerbations and symptoms. Avoiding exposure to asthma triggers may prevent asthma symptoms/exacerbation. Additionally, your doctor will most likely prescribe a long-acting daily inhaled medication to control asthma. This is commonly known as a ‘controller inhaler’. Using that medication every day as directed can help prevent asthma symptoms from occurring and prevent you from having an asthma exacerbation.

Can I be seen through Scripted for my asthma?

Patients older than 18 years of age, who have been diagnosed with asthma and seen a doctor in the past 15 months, have used a SABA inhaler in the past, and currently use a long-acting controller inhaler,  may be seen through Scripted for a SABA inhaler. We recommend you are seen by a doctor if any of the following apply to you:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Body aches
  • Pregnant or breastfeeding

References

References: 

  1. Mims JW. Asthma: definitions and pathophysiology. Int Forum Allergy Rhinol. 2015;5 Suppl 1:S2-6.

Get Started with Scripted

Please complete the following fields

A text message will be sent to your phone to begin your Intake Form

Get Started with Scripted

Please complete the following fields

A text message will be sent to your phone to begin your Intake Form